The Best Steam Irons in 2020

It can be a challenge to find a quality steam iron that can get those stubborn wrinkles and creases out without a lot of effort on your part. The best one should be a nice weight, comfortable to use, have a high tank capacity, and put out a good shot of steam. Since there are so many brands and choices available, narrowing down the best one takes time.

We’ve reviewed the six best options on the market this year. Let’s check them out!

Our Top List

Last update on 2020-09-28 at 12:06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API


1. Rowenta DW5080

Rowenta DW5080 1700-Watt Micro Steam Iron Stainless Steel Soleplate with Auto-Off, 400-Hole, Brown

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This steam iron gives you 1,700 watts of power with over 400 different steam holes. The steam comes out at a rate of 35 grams per minute, and you can adjust the amount of steam and heat based on your fabric. The control knob comes centrally placed to make it easy to reach.

It’s easy to fill this iron with tap water, thanks to the clear tank hole. There is a three-way shutoff system that helps you avoid accidental burns and drips if the steam iron falls over. There is an anti-calcium system installed to prevent buildup, and the iron has an automatic cleaning mode you can engage between uses. This iron comes from Germany, and it has a stainless steel bottom.

Takeaways

  • Capacity – 10 ounces
  • Cord Length – Seven
  • Steam Output – 38 grams per minute

Pros

  • Three-way shutoff system installed
  • Has an automatic cleaner
  • 400 individual steam holes
  • Very compact

Cons

  • Only holds 10 ounces of water at one time

2. Rowenta DG8520 Perfect Steam

Rowenta DG8520 Perfect Steam 1800-Watt Eco Energy Steam Iron Station Stainless Steel Soleplate, 400-Hole, Purple

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This steam iron gives you five bars of pressure that can tackle both small and larger wrinkles with ease. You get a 1.9-meter power cord that allows you great freedom of movement to smooth wrinkles from drapes or move around your clothes. You get constant steam of high-powered steam with the touch of a button.

The 47-ounce water tank is extra-large, and it’s easy to remove to clean or refill between uses. You get 1.5 hours of continuous steaming from a single tank, and this model can run on 20% less energy than other options. There is an anti-scale function with a rinsing system to keep your steam iron in excellent working order.

Takeaways

  • Capacity – 47 ounces
  • Cord Length – 1.9 meters
  • Steam Output – 80 g/minute

Pros

  • Runs on 20% less energy
  • Gives you 1.5 hours of steam per tank
  • Has a longer power cord

Cons

  • May not get hot enough

3. Singer Expert Finish Iron

SINGER | Expert Finish Iron 1700W EF.04 Anti-Drip, Stainless Steel Soleplate, LED Display

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This steam iron brings 1,700 watts of power to each project you take on, and this iron comes wrapped in a sleek and modern package. You get an even steam distribution along the entire soleplate of the iron, and it has an LCD temperature control that gives you a high level of control and accuracy.

The cord can swivel 360-degrees, and this swivel action makes it easy to move around your garment without worrying about tangling the cord. The three-way automatic shutoff is a great safety feature, and this feature will switch the iron off if you don’t use it for 30 seconds or if it falls over. You get a limited warranty on this purchase that lasts two years.

Takeaways

  • Capacity – 35 ounces
  • Cord Length – 7.8
  • Steam Output – Continuous stream

Pros

  • Has an anti-drip design
  • Will automatically shut off
  • Has a two-year limited warranty attached

Cons

  • Difficult to get in touch with customer service

4. T-fal FV4495 Ultraglide

T-fal FV4495 Ultraglide Easycord Steam Iron Ceramic Scratch Resistant Non-Stick Soleplate with Auto-Off and Anti-Drip System, 1725-Watt, Black, Medium

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This one comes equipped with a 100% ceramic soleplate that is very durable. It has a lifetime warranty attached to it, and this material ensures that it’ll withstand repeated use without breaking or cracking. The surface has a non-stick coating that resists scratches and helps it glide over your fabric.

After eight minutes of inactivity, this iron will automatically power down for safety. You also get an automatic three-way off feature. The power cord is an impressive 12 long, and it won’t tangle or get in your way when you use it. This iron has a self-cleaning system to prevent scaling, and this system will ensure that it’s ready to go when you need it.

Takeaways

  • Capacity – Nine ounces
  • Cord Length – 12
  • Steam Output – 100 g/minute

Pros

  • Has a lifetime warranty
  • Shuts off after eight minutes of inactivity
  • Has a hassle-free cord

Cons

  • Instructions are difficult to read

5. Rowenta DW9280 Digital Display Iron

Rowenta DW9280 Digital Display Steam Iron, Stainless Steel Soleplate, 1800-Watt, 400-Hole, Blue

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This is a modern steam iron that has a royal purple coloring. It gives you 1,800 watts of power, and it comes with a 210 gram per minute output that is powerful enough to use on multiple types of fabric. You get 400 steam holes with a smooth glide technology to protect your clothes and get the wrinkles out.

The LED indicator is very easy to read, and it comes with a smart steam motion sensor embedded. The water tank is significantly larger than other picks on our list, and this allows you to work much longer without refilling it. There is an anti-calcium system that ensures the iron lasts longer and is always ready to use.

Takeaways

  • Capacity – 350 milliliters
  • Cord Length – 2.5 meters
  • Steam Output – 210 g/minute

Pros

  • Smart steam motion sensor
  • Shuts off if it falls over in 30 seconds
  • Sleek and modern design

Cons

  • Whole iron can get how

6. PurSteam Professional Grade 1700W Iron

Professional Grade 1700W Steam Iron for Clothes with Rapid Even Heat Scratch Resistant Stainless Steel Sole Plate, True Position Axial Aligned Steam Holes, Self-Cleaning Function

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The final iron on our list of the best steam irons is by PurSteam. This model has a thick chromium finish that resists rust and corrosion, and it gives you very even steam distribution on a broad range of fabrics. The thermostat control is within easy reach, and this position allows you to adjust it as you move your iron across the fabric without worrying about it getting too hot.

The rapid heat technology allows you to start steaming your garments much sooner to reduce your project time, and this iron comes with an anti-drip system to keep your clothes dry while reducing the risk of burns. Every iron goes through rigorous testing to ensure it works and doesn’t leak before they ship it out.

Takeaways

  • Capacity – 15 ounces
  • Cord Length – Eight
  • Steam Output – Continuous but adjustable

Pros

  • Three-way automatic shutoff
  • Chromium finish
  • Easy to adjust the temperature

Cons

  • Temperature control knob can stick

Verdict & Review

Rowenta DW5080

9.6

Ease of use

9.7/10

Instructions

9.5/10

Performance

9.6/10

Design

9.5/10

Quality

9.6/10

Pros

  • Three-way shutoff system
  • Has an automatic cleaner
  • 400 individual steam holes
  • Very compact

Cons

  • Only holds 10 oz. of water at a time

Our pick for the best steam iron is the Rowenta DW5080 because you get a powerful steam output with over 400 different steam holes to take on thin and stubborn wrinkles. You can control how hot the steam is in relation to the fabric you want to smooth out. It’s nice that you can use tap water without fear of breaking it.

We liked that this steam iron has an anti-calcium system installed. It also comes with an automatic cleaning mode, and the iron comes from Germany. Finally, we liked that it can with high-quality materials that will last without breaking down.

Buyer’s Guide

What characteristics should you look for in your new steam iron? Are there some things that are more important than others? If you plan to upgrade your current steam iron or you’re buying one for the first time, you want to keep the following buying considerations in mind.

By the way, great alternatives to irons are steam presses and handheld steamers.

Settings

Unless you plan to use your steam iron on one type of fabric, you’ll need variable temperature settings. For example, wool will need a much higher temperature setting to get the wrinkles out than cotton would. If you can’t adjust the temperature, you run the risk of scorching the fabric when you try to steam iron it.

Soleplate

Do you want a ceramic or a stainless steel soleplate? Stainless steel tends to be the material that lasts longer than ceramic, but it also makes it easier to scorch. Ceramic wears out quicker, but it’s more forgiving and less likely to leave scorch marks on your clothing. Check and see if there is a warranty on it, how long it lasts, and what it does and doesn’t cover.

Steam Output

You can measure the steam output on your iron in grams per minute. The higher this number is, the more powerful the steam will be. If you’re only going to use it on lightweight materials, you won’t have to worry so much about having a high amount of grams per minute. However, thicker fabrics will require more steam to straighten out the wrinkles.

Cord

The cord will tether you to the wall if it isn’t long enough, and it’s also easy to tangle if you move around a lot when you use your steam iron. Cords start at around five and go up over nine . Look for an iron with a longer cord. Another thing to think about is getting a cord that swivels at the attachment point to the iron because this can keep it out of your way.

Weight

These irons can get heavy, which is especially true when you first fill the tank to start using it. Ideally, you’ll get a nicely balanced iron that isn’t so heavy that it constantly fatigues you. Double-check the listed weight and see if it’s too heavy for the work you want to do with it. If you plan to steam your drapes, you’ll hold the iron higher up in the air. This can lead to faster fatigue levels with a heavier iron.

Safety Features

Steam can be very dangerous to work around, and the last thing you want to end up with is a steam burn. There’s also a real possibility that it could start a fire if it tips over on your clothing, and you don’t see it. Get an iron with safety features like an automatic off. This will switch the iron off if it tips over or if it’s inactive for a set amount of time.

Warranty

This may not be a hugely expensive investment, but you do want to have a warranty to protect you against defects or damage. Check and see if you get a full or limited warranty. If it’s a limited one, see what it’ll cover. You want to check the warranty length because it can vary from a few months or years to a lifetime.

FAQ

Is a stainless steel or ceramic iron better?

A stainless steel soleplate gives you a great amount of glide when you iron. Stainless is also very easy to clean while being resistant to scratching. However, ceramic soleplates are better for beginners because they help prevent scorching. They do tend to wear out much faster than stainless because they have a special coating. Both options are solid. Start with a ceramic an upgrade to a steel soleplate once you get the hang of using your steam iron.

How long should a steam iron last?

How long your iron lasts will depend on the brand, build quality, and how much you use it. Old models were built to survive for 10 to 20 years easily. Today’s models are slightly less durable, and your iron could last between 5 to 10 years before you need to toss it out and replace it. Some will last longer, and some will break much sooner.

Can you leave water in a steam iron?

You can, but it’s not a good idea to leave water in your iron. There is a simple reason for this. The water can leave deposits on the inside of your iron that will eventually clog the steam holes. You want to wash or rinse and dry it out after every use to keep it in good working condition.

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